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samedi 24 janvier 2015

Hidden face, penis out : what the fuck happened during men fashion week

Oh yes. 
You did not miss that. Rick Owens just make the male's attributes totally free this week at men Paris fashion week.
I don't know how to react. I think the idea is so crazy I love it. I laughed, I tried to figure out a meaning.


And then...say hi!



This man always knew how to shake our tidy and so wise fashion weeks. This season, he put avant-garde on another level. Is this basic provocation? Maybe, maybe not. But this is not what I am wondering. Actually, I don't even want to find a real philosophical reason behind that: I watch, I have fun, and I appreciate a collection, which, behind some of the few little "full-frontal display" silhouettes, is really good. And I think this is the whole purpose, when he declared "Let's not forget a bit of cheerful depravity". Style.com writes "So why would he bother with such?". Yes, I think the only lesson given to the fashion industry here is "why so serious?". After all I think nudity should not be such a big deal in 2015, after a 2014 year focused on every girl's butt and twerking skills.
End of.
"I built the company on me pissing in my mouth." Rick Owens was thinking back to the sculpture that scandalized Pitti Uomo years ago. Then he pondered the "puerility" of the full-frontal display in his men's show today. "It's a little bit of juvenile transgression," he mused. "Boys with their dicks out is such a simple, primal, childish gesture." 
Source: Style.com



 In the mean time, some designers decided to hide their models' faces. It was the case of the first John Galliano's couture collection for Maison Margiela, and of the men's Givenchy collection this week.

What is happening right now? When designers dare to expose what should be politically incorrect to show, and covers their models' faces, what is the message behind that?
Are the clothes the only things to focus on, forgetting about the body and the physical aspect? Is there any societal issues depicted there?
Moreover the red tint given to the face in both collection is not meaningless. It inspires me a certain violence, a face covered by blood at Givenchy, then covered by jewels at Margiela, drawing a deconstructed skull face.


Givenchy


Maison Margiela couture's final silhouette

It is somewhat reminiscent of the famous Alexander McQueen's diamond face-mask, covering the model's entire head. I think that McQueen never made a collection without any true meaning and always created story-telling pieces. 
Are we blinded by all these shiny stones? Are we hiding ourself behind extravagance? 

I don't have the ambition of telling what McQueen was meaning. 
But this type of creations always give food for thought. And I think the fashion industry also  can (and should) have this hat.





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